Enhanced Gotek: The Brutek!

Brutek PCB imageFor a long time, I have worked on recreating the Gotek and in the process adding extra features and several bugfixes from the original Gotek. v1.0 was just a prototype replica of the original Gotek with some of the pinheaders moved for easier flashing. I just wanted to see if I could get one to work. Summer 2019, I gifted v1.0 to everyone that showed up to a local Amiga game night and requested they would perform extensive testing. They all still work, but they had some design flaws like the screw holes was not at the correct location, regulator needed more cooling area, the PCB was about 4mm too short, the tactile switches was placed too close. So I modified my “Bruktmoped” Amiga 500 internal frame to fit the replica with wrong screwhole placement, so my testers could place the prototype internally to their A500 machines.
v1.1 had these issues rectified and I decided to implement the mods that the awesome FlashFloppy firmware supports, plus some things I wanted changed myself, including more SMT friendly layout compared to v1.0.

These are the things I have changed/added:

  • Added a power LED
  • Removed R10
  • Moved and added pinholes for more jumperfriendly layout.
  • Replaced the cheap electrolytics with SMD capacitors. (from v1.2 and up)
  • Used genuine ARM® Cortex®-M3 processor. (instead of those fake ones often found on Goteks from China.
  • Replaced STM32 output buffer with more suitable chip for that application. (From 74HC04 to 74HCT04)
  • Added 3pcs SMD LEDs (from v1.2 and up)
  • Replaced R13 with higher value resistor for more stable programming. (From v1.2 and up)
  • Added pulldown resistor to Boot1.
  • Made holes for optional header to pullup Boot1 with a jumper.
  • Board identifier set to support Enhanced Gotek mode with FlashFloppy.
  • Added support for the upcoming FlashFloppy feature “Second drive support” (PA3 pulled up.)
  • Added jumper friendly pinholes for the upcoming FlashFloppy feature “Second drive support”
  • Added LED for the upcoming FlashFloppy feature “Second drive support”
  • Added motor ON feature. (For future FlashFloppy features)
  • Holes to connect Rotary encoder, with extra pin for drive eject/insert
  • Onboard speaker holes for passive buzzer. (for drive sound emulation)
  • Transistor circuit so even 5V active buzzer or magnetic speaker can be used, and higher volume is possible.
  • Added pullups to SCL and SDA so there is no need for modification when using a two- or four-row LCD with I2C backpack board
    instead of the usual 7-segment original Gotek type display, or a OLED screen. (From v1.0 and up)
  • Added pullups to several floating datalines.
  • Moved and changed Crystal to high accuracy SMD version. (from v1.2 and up)
  • Made fiducials for factory SMT option.
  • Changed values on several passives.
  • Did a google for other enhanced Goteks, and borrowed some great component placement ideas from other
    PCB designers smarter than me! (from v1.2 and up)
  • Correct pullups for SCL and SDA so the 4.7k resistors mentioned in flashfloppy OSD guide is already in place.

Pi1541 Zero edition

This version of the Pi1541 is made just as small as the Raspberry Pi Zero. It will run on Raspberry Pi 1, Zero, Pi2 and Pi3, but the small size makes it perfect for the Pi Zero computer. Size limitation made no room for a screen, but all the other accessories are there, like Power LED, activity LED, Buzzer to emulate drive sound, reset button and 5X menu buttons.

Note: currently the Pi’s HDMI screen is not suppported on the Pi Zero, 1 or 2.
Note: currently the USB keyboard and drives are not suppported on the Pi Zero, 1 or 2.
Note: currently the emulated drive sounds are not suppported on the Pi Zero, 1 or 2.
These will be supported later, and the hardware is already set up for it when it is supported.

So what is this Pi1541? The Pi1541 is a real time, cycle exact 1541 emulator by Steve White. It basically connects to a Raspberry Pi 1, Zero, 2 or 3 to emulate a Commodore 1541 floppy drive. (If you want to overclock those older Pi models, Use the config.txt to set the values. The sign # is used to make the Pi ignore the text. Remove it to enable the settings.) Why do we need this when there is the SD2IEC? Its because a lot of games and demos utilize the chips inside the 1541 floppy drive, so without them, the program or game will not work. Here, the Pi is emulating those chips, so that the games will work. No more games that wont load due to incompatibility. The Pi1541 has all the buttons, LEDs, connectors and stuff that ports the Pi to your old computer. It can be used with your Commodore 64 or 128, VIC20, C16 or even the Plus/4. All you have to do is to copy the files over to the root of the Pi memory card, and copy your games and program into the same SD-card and insert it into the Raspberry Pi. You should check out the authors website for the latest version of the software. Link is below.

There are several ways to use this, but I decided to use it the same way I used to use the SD2IEC. I just start the File Browser and use the C64 keyboard to select my game. When everything is connected and turned on, I just use it as if it was a normal 1541 floppy. The latest news it that now, it also can emulate the Commodore 1581 floppy drive, it supports more file versions and it now also supports USB thumbdrives too!

Look at the size difference between the Zero and the “normal” Pi1541. The one in the picture has the limited edition 1.3″ OLED screen.

SD CARD SETUP

1. Format an SD card to Fat32.

2. Download the Raspberry Pi Firmware from the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

3. Copy the files bootcode.bin, fixup.dat and start.elf (found in firmware-master\boot)) into the root folder of your SD card.

4. Copy over a file that contains a 1541 ROM image into the root folder of the SD card. The ROM must be called dos1541 or d1541.rom or d1541II or Jiffy.bin.

5. (OPTIONAL) Copy over a file that contains a CBM font ROM (eg vice-3.1\C64\chargen) into the root folder of the SD card. The ROM must be called chargen. This will enable Commodore charset on the screen.

6. Copy your disk images and folders into the 1541 folder now found on the SD card. Or, simply download the below pre made setup and extract it to a SD card. You can start with that to be up and running right away.

This is the root contents on my SD card when using a Pi3. Just an example.

This is the root contents on my SD card when using a Pi2. Just an example.

This is the root contents on my SD card when using a Pi Zero. Just an example.

This is the root contents on my SD card when using a Pi 1. Just an example.

The only 2 differences between this setup and the one from my full version, is this setting in the options.txt file found in the root folder of the SD card: “splitIECLines = 1” must be changed to: “// splitIECLines = 1” and Each version of Raspberry Pi needs their own files due to different CPU and speed. Choose the one you have from the list above.

 

This project with PCB and parts can be purchased on ebay:  https://www.ebay.com/usr/kirsti_73
or from Sellmyretro.com

4 player adapter for Commodore 64/128

 

This little adapter plugs to the user port of the C64, C128, VIC-20 or CBM 610 computers. Here is a list of some of the games that support this adapter:
 
    • Alone in the Green
    • Amazing Maze
    • Bomb Mania
    • Garrison
    • Hockey Mania
    • IK+ Gold
    • Marble Madness
    • M.U.L.E.
    • Pac It
    • Phong!
    • Quadris
    • Quadtron
    • Rampage Gold
    • Snacks 4 Snakes
    • Space Lords
    • Square Attack
    • Ivan ‘Ironman’ Stewart’s Super Off Road
    • Tanks 3000
    • Team Patrol
    • Tour de France 2005
When I made this, I wanted more than just to add 2 more joystick ports.
Since a lot of C64 models does not support a reset via the serial port. (I made the Pi1541 with a reset button on the serial port) I figured I should at least add a reset button on this device. Using the user port to reset the C64 is probably the safest and easiest way to ensure a reset that works on all models. But, I did not stop there. The user port is also a port that connects to both the internal AC 9V, and the DC 5V. So I made one LED for each of these power rails, so that this module can be used to verify if the computer actually gets any power. When the power light on the computer lights up, it does not mean that the AC 9V is working, and to test it, you will have to open it up and do the measurements manually. Measuring the PSU at the plug is risky business, since a slip can short your PSU. Now, all you have to do is to plug this in to verify that the power is working. Since LEDs use power, and might be annoying, I made sure they can be disabled with a jumper too. Notice how none of the other 4 player adapters have all these features! Most don’t even have pullup resistors!
This one is FULLY LOADED!
Why a reset button?
The reset button is useful in several ways. For a gamer, it is handy is if you have some resident code in high part of the memory, beyond what many programs use. For example “Turbo Tape 64” relocates itself to SYS 50000 [$C350] which mean after loading a game with the turbo, you can often hit the reset button, type in SYS 50000 and the turbo was reenabled and ready to load the next program. Of course if the loaded program extended beyond this address you would have to reload the turbo program from tape or disk.
A reset button will retain almost all the RAM contents, so you can recover from a crash. Powering the computer off and on will clear the memory completely
Another use would be to enter cheats to games, which came as POKEs to various locations in memory to give you infinite lives etc., with a SYS call to restart the game.
As a coder: Hit the reset button and sys 32768 and you are back in Turbo Assembler. All other resident programs would still be there, like a tape turbo. Best of all, you’d keep on hacking the night away without having to reload your source.
Partslist:

2x D-SUB 9
2x LEDs
8x 10k Resistors
1x Diode
1X 220R resistor
1x 1k resistor
1x Custom PCB
1x 100nF Capacitor
2x Jumpers
2x 2 pin
1x Tactile switch
1x User port connector
1x Data Selector/Multiplexer

This project with PCB and parts can be purchased on ebay:  https://www.ebay.com/usr/kirsti_73
or from Sellmyretro.com

Soldering

Every now and then, I come across someone that tells me they can’t solder electronics. But the good news it, chances are that not only can you solder, but you can solder well too.

If you tried and failed, you probably did not have the right equipment for the job. Soldering is much easier than you probably thought. But for it to be successful, you need the correct tools. You can even go for the cheapest Chinese options and be successful.

The first obstacle is usually a wrong soldering iron with a tip that is probably corroded and the wrong size. Many people uses soldering irons made for plumbing or heavy duty soldering. Its a given that expensive tools from professional equipment manufacturers will be the best option if you can afford them. But thats not for the average beginner. This is what I recommend for the cheapest option:

  • A soldering station with adjustable temperature, and interchangeable tip.
  • An assortment of tips for the soldering iron
  • A brass tip cleaner
  • Decent quality thin solder wire,  I use 0.5mm for through-hole components and 0.3mm or solder paste for SMD

A lot of experts might laugh, but Ive used a cheap Chinese soldering station for years now, since I no longer have access to the high priced units at work anymore. I use it almost every day, and dont really care that its of lower quality than expensive ones.

What I would do, is to look for the latest Hakko clone there is, on eBay, Aliexpress or Amazon with search words like this: Soldering Station 852D, 936, 937D, 898D, 937D, and look for a soldering station that have a heat gun if you want to solder SMD, or at least a replaceable soldering iron with a 5pin banjo connector. The base station should work for years, but the iron itself will sooner or later need replacement. If you choose one that uses a 5pin banjo connector, replacements can be found for as little as $3-$5, and replacement tips can be had for $4-$5 for an assortment of 17pcs. Get one or two replacement irons for your drawer. But of course, if you got the money to spend, go for a Hakko and never look back. The solder wire on the other hand, will be where you put your money. No cheap Chinese stuff will do.

 

Commodore 64 Deadtest Cartridge

This particular diagnostics cartridge does not require a test harness, and are specifically useful when your C64/128 has no picture. What sets this cartridge apart from the other test cartridges, are that they all require the RAM to be functioning to boot, (unfortunately, one of the most common fault is defective RAM) This cartridge not only work with defective RAM, but it also can tell you which RAM is broken. The reason why this is possible, is that a correctly made DEAD TEST CART will not require the system RAM, but it will instead temporarily overwrite the kernal ROM bypassing a lot of functions needed to boot the computer. A random person can obviously just program his all purpose C64 cartridge PCB with the ROM file from the DEAD TEST Cart, but it will be useless when you really need it. Thats why I made this PCB specially for this one purpose, and did not just throw a ROM into a all purpose PCB.

Here is a link to the user manual.

This project with PCB and parts can be purchased on ebay:  https://www.ebay.com/usr/kirsti_73
or from Sellmyretro.com

Pi1541 Pennysaver Edition

Some people just want a SD card solution for their Commodore 64/128/VIC20 the cheapest way possible. So I came up with the “Pennnysaver Edition”. It has the bare minimum you would need to load your games and programs from a SD card, but with the possibillity for upgrades later. It can be used with your Commodore 64 or 128, VIC20, C16 or even the Plus/4. It will run on Raspberry Pi 1, Zero, Pi2 and Pi3. If you want to overclock those older Pi models, Use the config.txt to set the values. The sign # is used to make the Pi ignore the text. Remove it to enable the settings.

Note: currently the Pi’s HDMI screen is not suppported on the Pi Zero, 1 or 2.
Note: currently the USB keyboard and drives are not suppported on the Pi Zero, 1 or 2.
Note: currently the emulated drive sounds are not suppported on the Pi Zero, 1 or 2.
These will be supported later, and the hardware is already set up for it when it is supported.

Picture of the product.

The simplest working Pennysaver PCB only needs 3 parts to work..

This is the version Im listing on Ebay for my cheapest option. It has most of the important stuff, and the rest can easily be added by the customer if they want.

 

So what is this Pi1541? The Pi1541 is a real time, cycle exact 1541 emulator by Steve White. It basically connects to a Raspberry Pi 1, Zero, 2 or 3 to emulate a Commodore 1541 floppy drive. Why do we need this when there is the SD2IEC? Its because a lot of games and demos utilize the chips inside the 1541 floppy drive, so without them, the program or game will not work. Here, the Pi is emulating those chips, so that the games will work. No more games that wont load due to incompatibility. The Pi1541 has room for all the buttons, LEDs, connectors and stuff that ports the Pi to your old computer, includind OLED screen. It can be used with your Commodore 64 or 128, VIC20, C16 or even the Plus/4. All you have to do is to copy the files over to the root of the Pi memory card, and copy your games and program into the same SD-card and insert it into the Raspberry Pi. You should check out the authors website for the latest version of the software. Link is below.

There are several ways to use this, but I decided to use it the same way I used to use the SD2IEC. I just start the File Browser and use the C64 keyboard to select my game. When everything is connected and turned on, I just use it as if it was a normal 1541 floppy. The latest news it that now, it also can emulate the Commodore 1581 floppy drive, it supports more file versions and it now also supports USB thumbdrives too!

Pros:
– You will never face the potential compatibillity problems assosiated with the much discussed 7406 chip, since its not needed.
– Its extremely cheap to make and easy to solder with a minimum of parts.
– The PCB is ready for all the extras that I made for the full version, including reset switch, 5x menu switches, output for OLED screen, speaker that can be disabled with a jumper, power LED, activity LED, output so you can solder your own cable for the Commodore serial port, and it even fits my 3D printed case!!

Cons:
– You will not be able to use other devices at the same time on the same serial port as the Pi1541 Pennysaver, since I removed the 7406 chip and its assosiated parts. I recommend the full version if you plan to do so.

Underside of the product.

SD CARD SETUP

1. Format an SD card to Fat32.

2. Download the Raspberry Pi Firmware from the Raspberry Pi Foundation.

3. Copy the files bootcode.bin, fixup.dat and start.elf (found in firmware-master\boot)) into the root folder of your SD card.

4. Copy over a file that contains a 1541 ROM image into the root folder of the SD card. The ROM must be called dos1541 or d1541.rom or d1541II or Jiffy.bin.

5. (OPTIONAL) Copy over a file that contains a CBM font ROM (eg vice-3.1\C64\chargen) into the root folder of the SD card. The ROM must be called chargen

6. Copy your disk images and folders into the 1541 folder now found on the SD card.

Or, simply download the below pre made setup and extract it to a SD card. You can start with that to be up and running right away.

This is the root contents on my SD card when using a Pi3. Use it as it is, or edit if you want.

This is the root contents on my SD card when using a Pi2. Use it as it is, or edit if you want.

This is the root contents on my SD card when using a Pi Zero. Use it as it is, or edit if you want.

This is the root contents on my SD card when using a Pi 1. Use it as it is, or edit if you want.

 

The only difference between this setup and the one from my full version, is this setting in the options.txt file found in the root folder of the SD card: “splitIECLines = 1” must be changed to:
// splitIECLines = 1

 

This project with PCB and parts can be purchased on ebay:  https://www.ebay.com/usr/kirsti_73
or from Sellmyretro.com

Playing with stencils

Using a solder paste stencil is a quick way to get your production speed up when dealing with SMD parts (surface mount devices). At my house, its done because its fun and messy. But what exactly are they? A solder paste stencil is a metal or polymer plate with holes in it that represent the solder pads on your PCB.

This is a stencil for my Vehicle Charge Indicator. It can apply solder paste on 60 units at once.

All you have to do is to apply solder paste all over your stencil, remove it, and now a thin even layer of solder paste covers all your solder pads. Solder paste is liquid solder, often provided in a can or inside a syringe.

My preferred method is to place the target PCB in the middle of a wooden plate, align the stencil on top at the perfect spot, and later secure the target PCB with older PCS’s in all corners to keep it in place. Lastly, I have to secure the stencil in one corner perfectly aligned with the target PCB. If done correctly, I can now carefully replace the target as many times as I want, and flip the stencil over for a perfect fit with no hassle. I store it in a cardboard box for next time.

Old PCBs are used to keep the target PCB in place. To the left is the metal stencil ready to be folded over the target PCB.

Amiga Video PCB

I decided it was time to make some kind of replacement for the bulky Amiga 500 RF modulator. This little thing has a nice composite output and a S-VIDEO output for great video quality. Unfortunately, the female DB-23 connectors are hard to find, so I wont be making many of these.

dscf0834

I figured the AD724 would do nicely.

A little about the AD724:

The AD724 is a low cost RGB to NTSC/PAL Encoder that converts red, green and blue color component signals into their corresponding luminance (baseband amplitude) and chrominance (subcarrier amplitude and phase) signals in accordance with either NTSC or PAL standards. These two outputs are also combined to provide composite video output. All three outputs can simultaneously drive 75 Ω, reverse-terminated cables. All logical inputs are TTL, 3V and 5V CMOS compatible.

I do have several PCBs and parts available, but since the DB-23 connectors are not easily available, I will only post the PCB for sale.

Parts list: (position, value, size)

C1 100n 0805
C2 100n 0805
C3 100n 0805
C4 220u
C5 220u
C6 220u
C7 15p 0805*
C8 100n 0805
C9 10u
C10 2-22pF*
Q1 X-tal 4.433619 MHz for PAL, 3.579545MHz for NTSC
R1 75 0805
R2 75 0805
R3 75 0805
R4 75 0805
R5 75 0805
R6 75 0805
S-VIDEO MINIDIN6-MD-60S
U1 AD724 SOIC16W
VIDEO TOBU3 TOBU3
DSUB 23 Female

*Only one of these to be used, eighter one 15pF at C7, or one adjustable one at C10

The PCB is default PAL (pin 1 low), but you can pull pin 1 on the AD724 high to select NTSC. (PAL is low and NTSC is high)
This PCB has not been tested in NTSC mode.

This project PCB can be purchased on ebay:  https://www.ebay.com/usr/kirsti_73
or from Sellmyretro.com

Gotek USB floppy emulator

gotek

This is a great solution for replacing a old floppy drive. It works like this:
The gotek has built in 999 locations where you can place a floppydisk image. This image contains the contents of one floppy disk. These pre made images are usually easy to find on the Internet, but you can easily make a image of a real floppy disk you own.

All you have to do to use the gotek, is to put the images on a USB pen drive, and assign each disk a number. The gotek has 2 buttons in the front, where you can select the disks. One for up and one for down. Lets say you want to boot from a game or program that you assigned to slot 5. All you have to do, is to press the buttons untill the display shows 005, and the disk will load. You can press the buttons back and forth to select images, and your computer will behave as if you inserted that floppy disk. Its a great way to get rid of those old worn out floppy disks, and great to save space.

Available upgrades:
-Speaker that emulates floppy loading sounds!
-OLED screen that replaces the original display, so that the name of the disk is shown in letters instead of numbers, meaning you dont have to keep track of where you assigned your images.

The drive itself: The drive comes new with a really bad firmware that hardly can be used to anything. So you need to circomvent the protection of the drive, and flash it with a new firmware. I use FlashFloppy. If I sell one of these, they are already flashed with FlashFloppy.

Once the protection has been broken, future updates is as easy as to put the updated firmware in the root of the USB stick, and power on the gotek with both buttons in the front pressed in at once. The drive will now update itself. Be careful not to disconnect the power during this process.

This drive can be connected to any computer that has the same Shugart 34-pin header, such as

Acorn Archimedes
Acorn BBC Micro
Akai Synthesizers
Amstrad CPC
Atari ST
Commodore Amiga
DEC
Dragon
E-mu ESI-32
Ensoniq
General Music (GEM) Synthesizers
IBM PC
Korg
Memotech
MSX
NEC PC-98
Roland
Sequential Circuits Prophet 3000
Spectrum
Tandy Color Computer
TI-99/4A
UKNC, DVK

The FlashFloppy firmware ensures that they all work.

WARNING! If you connect the power cable in the back wrong, IT WILL KILL THE DRIVE.

Some computers require different jumper settings on the drive. Usually all you have to do, is to move jumper S1 to S0. If that dont work, try these options:

Jumper at S1 only
Jumpers at JC and S0
Jumpers at JC and S1

These files must reside in the root of the USB stick for it to work

This project with PCB and parts can be purchased on ebay:  https://www.ebay.com/usr/kirsti_73
or from Sellmyretro.com

Magic Desk Cartridge Clone

[001705]

This cartridge is a modified reproduction of the Magic Desk Cart made for Commodore 64. That particular cartridge had several tools accessible via a menu. This cartridge is built with the same idea, only with a bigger ROM, and by using a ROM that can be erased electrically without using a UV eraser. This cart is wired to support the more modern W27C512 roms, and W27C020 roms, selectable by a jumper, instead of those older roms that is no longer made.

Partlist:
1pcs 74LS174N
1pcs 74LS02N
1pcs W27C512
1pcs reset switch
1pcs PCB
Optional: IC sockets

To program this, you need the working games or programs that you want to install in the correct format, and a tool to generate the .bin file that goes into the rom. You can download the tool here.

First of all, all programs must be in .prg format. Just place the .prg files you want to use in the prg folder, the name of the file will be used as menu name.

This project with PCB and parts can be purchased on ebay:  https://www.ebay.com/usr/kirsti_73
or from Sellmyretro.com

Vehicle Charge Indicator

Not every vehicle is equipped with equipment that tells you that the charging system is not working. That is certainly true for several of my vehicles. So decided to think of a way to monitor the charging system, but since I do not want some kind of big, expensive, ugly device for this, I decided that I should just make a simple solution with a LED and some kind of small circuit board. So I came up with this.

DSCF0718

Look how small it is! 10pcs PCBs ready for a LED in one end and a Power cable on the other. The green and red LEDs are 3mm, and the blue and yellow are 5mm. The bigger ones are 8mm and 10mm, and gets more visible, but require a bigger mounting hole.

This can be used on Cars, Motorcycles, Mopeds, ATVs, Boats, Tractors, Snowmobiles, Snowblowers, Lawn mowers etc. anything that have a charging system. 6v, 12v and 24v versions can be made from the same PCB.

Its simple. If the alternator is charging, the LED lights up. No light, no charge. The design is made so that you can connect it directly on the battery or on the output from your rectifier, and it will not drain any power while the vehicle is not in use. There is no fuse, so you might want to add one to the wire. The circuit can handle reverse voltage for a while, but sooner or later the diode will break down, so try to connect positive to positive and negative to negative.

The idea is that with only a small hole somewhere suitable on the vehicle, one could drill a hole for one LED, ranging from 3mm to 10mm depending on available room and personal preference. I wanted the device to be as small as possible, so I went with SMD parts, to save space. Just for fun, Im gonna try to post this device on ebay, but if you rather want to make your own, I will let you know how it works, and list the parts you need.

charge-indicator

Partlist:
D1: 12v Zener Diode
R1: 56 Ohm Resistor
D2: 1N4007 Diode
L1: LED
LED holder
Shrink tube

The theory is this:

We don’t want the LED to power on unless the vehicle is charging. So the power from the battery will be blocked by the Zener Diode (D1). But when charging is taking place, the voltage to the battery will be a raised from around 12v to around 14v. A normal charge would be from 13.7v to 14.7v. If you get less or more than that, you need to check your regulator. When the Zener diode (D1) reach the breakdown voltage generated by the charging system, power will pass through, and make the LED (L1) turn on. The resistor (R1) is there to protect the LED (L1). The resistor value can be changed according to how bright you want the LED to shine. D2 is there to protect from reverse voltage generated by the alternator.

For a 6v charging system, all you need to do is to replace D1 with a 6V Zener Diode.
For a 24v charging system, all you need to do is to replace D1 with a 24V Zener Diode.

This project with PCB and parts can be purchased on ebay:  https://www.ebay.com/usr/kirsti_73

Power Healer 64

Due to several friends have contacted me about my old Commodore 64 power saver, the Power Healer 64, Ive decided to revive the project and has made brand new design to this old gizmo from 2006. This time, I made 2 versions. One that is basically the same original design but with a few SMD parts to make sure that I keep the same old size that fits inside those cheap plastic cases they sell on ebay, and make room for a few smal improvements. The original size will also ensure that it will fit inside a C64 for those that want to make it invisible.PCB image

The second XL version is more like a replacement PSU with included Saver circuitry and extra fuses. The bigger one will be a nice alternative for people with no PSU at all.

[003955]

More information will be published within a few days or so.